Katherine Shea

Georgie Romero Is Done For

A horror comedy audio drama podcast. Georgie Romero, a zombie, has risen from the grave, driven to solve the mystery of her former human life with the help of an inept witch and a cynical ghost.

Rachel Greenberg, producer/co-writer/co-producer

Socks Whitmore, producer/lead actor

Evan Johnson, composer/sound engineer

Elliot Yokum, sound design

Joana P. Cardozo

The Naked Hours For 100 hours, I cut 2 x 2 inches black paper with scissors and covered the L-Shape Gallery walls at the California Institute of the Arts. I did not speak. I did not use a cell phone or other electronics. I ate, rested, wrote, and meditated as necessary. I left the gallery […]

Kai Luen Liang

“On Sept 11th, 2001 I watched the twin towers falling with my father. Glued to the TV. A silent demolition. An American reality TV show. In the weeks that followed, I started to see American flags everywhere. Especially from immigrants of all colors, flying the flag out of a sense of fear of appearing to […]

Kathleen Fox

Don’t Let Me Be Lonely is an architectural projection performance inspired by Claudia Rankine’s book of poems of the same name. The projection mapping explores loneliness as it exists at CalArts both before and during the COVID19 Crisis. Rankine defines loneliness as “What we cannot do for each other.” This performance, in the Main Gallery […]

Dongpu Ling

I am interested in the inaccurate and unpredictable result that a machine can make. In order to understand its “mind”, I train the machine using images that have not been cropped, to see how it understands a thing that has not be seen before.

Christine Lee

“Happy Headroom” was part of my mid-residency show titled “Living Threads” in February 2020. The immersive installation consisted of 4-channel video and sculptures. In this video, my mom and I perform rituals as a visceral process to create a dialogue between changing states of self and site. Hair, simultaneously dead and living, functions as a […]

Steve Weir

The Alleys series documents a lesser-known casualty of the construction boom in Seattle—alleyways. While they often carry a negative reputation, they are an integral part of the urban landscape.